Foundation paper piecing that won't make you want to lay down in traffic

20-some years ago, my sister was born, changing my life for the better in so many ways. I had a playmate, a friend, a partner in crime. We have had our rough patches, but I love her dearly and couldn’t ask for a better sister. While we’re very different from each other, we have much in common – sewing, for one. She recently taught me a technique that changed the way I was paper piecing (or wasn’t paper piecing, since I was always so frustrated with it that I usually shoved those projects aside in favor of something that wouldn’t make me crazy). The method she uses isn’t radical – instead of sewing through her paper pattern piece, she uses freezer paper, a dry iron, and folding to create beautifully pieced blocks. Now I do too!

Trace your block onto the dull side of freezer paper.  Number the pieces in the same way you would for a regular paper pattern. In the example below, I added my seam allowance to the block. I’m apt to mess that part up – out of sight, out of mind – but you don’t have to. Just prepare the pattern the same way you usually would – just use freezer paper.

Select a scrap of fabric for piece #1. Make sure it is large enough to cover the whole space with .25″ seam allowance on all sides. I hold mine up to the light to check. If it is much larger (like my example), don’t worry about cutting it down to size. By the time we’re done with this block all of your seam allowances will be beautiful and the piece will be the perfect size.

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Hit it with an iron. You’ll want to put the wrong side of your fabric against the freezer paper and tack it in place with a dry iron.

Fold the freezer paper along the line between piece 1 and piece 2. Trim the exposed fabric to a .25″ seam allowance. I eyeball it, but you can use a rotary cutter and ruler if you like…it’s more time intensive, but if it makes you feel better, go for it.

Select a scrap of fabric for piece #2. Make sure it is large enough to cover the whole space with .25″ seam allowance on all sides. Place this piece right sides together with piece #1, aligning the edges. Sew with a .25″ seam allowance, right up against the freezer paper. If you accidentally sew into the freezer paper, it’s not the end of the world. If you can avoid doing that, you can reuse the template 3-4 times before it loses it’s stick, so try not to.

Fold the freezer paper pattern back to flat, ironing briefly over the seam allowances to hold them in place. Then fold piece #2 out and iron as well.

Continue folding, trimming, sewing, and ironing for all of the pieces in your pattern. When you’re done, it will look something like this.

This is the point where I pull out the rotary cutter and square up my block.

Once you’ve trimmed the edges, you can peel back the freezer paper template to reuse until it loses it’s stick. Your block will be beautiful front AND back!

I’m including a printable version of this pattern for you. I’d love to hear what you think of the technique!