Quilting in circles

One of my favorite things about making a quilt is deciding how to quilt it...what sort of pattern or texture will bring out the best in the quilt top. I recently tried quilting a spiral and loved how it worked with the star shape of the quilt design. I also loved how easy it was to do on my home sewing machine. I used it again for a star-based design and am sharing the results with you today.

I used this great tutorial from verrykerryberry when learning how to quilt a spiral. You start by stitching along a small paper template of the spiral and then work your way out. I printed out her template and pinned it to the center of my quilt.

I used a short stitch length to begin with so that the paper would be easy to tear away, and a walking foot is a must - moving a decent sized quilt in a tight circle like that is no joke, but it does get easier the further you get from the center.

After I got the first few rounds out of the way, I increased my stitch length and added the guide bar to my walking foot. I aligned it with the spiral I had just stitched so that I could keep even spacing between the rounds as I went.

From there, it was just a matter of keeping the guide aligned as I went. The larger the spiral, the easier it was to spin the quilt around and I made pretty good time!

All told, this 40" x 40" baby quilt took about 20 minutes to quilt. It's a dense enough stitching pattern that I know the quilt will hold up well to the wear and tear of a small kid and I think the spiral really complements the quilt design.

Even the back looks good! And yes...that IS minky backing. (Thanks, walking foot...I couldn't have done it without you)

Arrowhead Quilt

Perhaps you'll remember my Autumn Arrowhead quilt block. In case you don't, check out this post to see how this SUPER easy block is constructed. (When I say SUPER easy, I mean it...I sewed all of my blocks for this quilt in under 2 hours.) While these blocks can certainly be pieced side by side, I tried something different for this quilt.

My sister and I decided that our favorite aunt should have a quilt made with this block for her birthday this year. We divided up the fabric and each made 10 blocks. We used the same neutral gray fabric for all of the blocks and a variety of solids and prints in a colorway we think she'll like. I added sashing and cornerstones when piecing the top, and I think it really added to the overall design.

Write here...

Write here...

I used free motion quilting in the neutral spaces of the blocks, and some straight-line quilting in the sashing, leaving the prints/solids unquilted. I'm usually a very dense-coverage sort of quilter, so this was a new approach for me, and it makes the prints really pop.

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Now all we have to do is bind it and gift it!

Twin Quilts for Twin Beds

When your teen daughter can no longer sit up in her bunk bed without conking herself on the ceiling, it's time for a bedroom makeover. New furniture was a necessity, new paint just made sense, and that left me with no choice but to make new quilts.

I decided to make the girls the same quilt pattern from the same line of fabric, but did my best to make them look different enough that it felt like each quilt was uniquely tailored to each girl's taste. I selected Tucker Prairie Fabric by 1Canoe2, and this free quilt pattern from Moda's Bake Shop.

The bulk of the quilt is made from jelly rolls - what a time saver! I haven't worked with jelly rolls very much, but they worked great for these quilts. The remaining pieces are made with HST's, so these quilts sewed up very quickly.

For each girl, I selected different focal fabrics from the line, and then altered the placement of my jelly roll strips to look best with those fabrics. I think it worked out well - they look like completely different quilts while still complementing each other!

Veranda Quilt Pattern

In January, I released my Hideaway fabric collection to Spoonflower, and decided it was high time I made a quilt with my own fabric. I came up with a simple pattern that allowed me to show off the prints, and I'm calling it the Veranda quilt.

I received a lot of positive feedback on this quilt, and by popular demand, I'm excited to offer this free pattern to you! The instructions include directions for a throw size quilt (60" x 60") or a baby quilt (48" x 48"), but this 12" finished block can be used to make any size quilt your heart desires!

You can download the pattern here, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed designing it - Happy Quilting! And be sure to share your quilt on IG - #verandaquilt

Autumn Arrowhead

Happy October! I'm celebrating my favorite month by sharing a quilt block with you for the first time in a looooooooong time. I'm this month's queen bee for the Columbus Modern Quilters, and I selected the Arrowhead block as my block of the month. This is a traditional quilt block, pieced in a very simple way – my sample block took about 10 minutes to make, and I was pausing for photos.

For those of you in the bee, please choose a light and a dark fabric. As you can see from my block, bright and bold are my thing – just make sure there is some contrast. Please stay away from low volume or solid fabric.

Place two 10” squares right sides together. Begin sewing 3” down from the top right edge. When you're 1/4” from the edge, pivot and stitch to the bottom left edge, backstitching at the end.

Rotate the block 180° and repeat for the last two sides.

Cut the unit diagonally, through the sewn corners. You will have two triangle units.

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Stack the two triangle units with the opening in the bottom left corner. Measure 3” from the left and cut through both units.

Now measure 3” from the bottom and cut through both units.

Open all of the sewn units and press the seams toward the light fabric. (This will help everything nest together nicely when sewn.) Lay out the pieces as shown.

Sew the pieces together in three units as shown. Then sew the three units together to make the block.

Square up and trim the block to 11.5”. Congratulate yourself on a job well done!