Put your napkin in your lap-kin

Cloth napkins are a great way to dress up your holiday table, and also make a beautiful and practical gift. We use cloth napkins as our everyday napkins - they're durable, eco-friendly, and can be made from a variety of fun and interesting fabrics. They're incredibly simple to sew, so you have plenty of time to whip them up for a party you're hosting this holiday season or as a host/ess gift for one you'll be attending.

Supplies needed: Two yards of fabric per 4 napkins - cotton and linen fabrics recommended. I used different fabrics front and back (1 yard each), but you can also make them from the same fabric.

Cost: This will depend largely on your fabric choice, but you can ballpark at about $5.00 per napkin.

Time: Under an hour for each set.

I like to use two fabrics, one each for front and back, when I make napkins. There's no rule saying you have to do this, but I think it makes them more versatile. I chose a print in shades of white and green and a solid. The solid is a cross-weave, meaning the fabric is woven from two colors of thread - in this case, bright blue and green were used to create a darker blue-green.

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You'll need to cut your fabric down into fat quarters, approximately 18" x 22" - which is essentially cutting your yard of fabric in half each way. Since fabrics will vary in width, work from the dimensions of your narrowest fabric and trim as necessary.

Pin your fabrics together, right sides facing, and sew around the edge with a .25" seam allowance, turning at the corners, and leaving an opening about 2-3" unsewn so you can flip them right side out.

Trim the seam allowance diagonally at the corners so you'll get a nice, crisp point when you turn them. Flip the napkins right side out and press, ensuring that the seam allowance from your opening is tucked inside.

Topstitch around the edges about 1/8" from the edge, turning at the corners.

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Now your napkins are ready to gift and enjoy!

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Making Friends

This week's Handmade Holiday gifts are a lot of fun to make and even more fun to play with! I'm sharing how to make stuffed toys from cut-and-sew panels and fabric.

This type of project holds a special place in my heart...a few years ago, I designed a doll house pillowcase for my niece for Christmas.

She loved it and ultimately it became my first commercial fabric line, Let's Play House. That project is now available here as a free pattern from Robert Kaufman.

Today I'll be sharing 3 different cut-and-sew toy projects that sew up in no time and are sure to delight the little folks in your life.

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Supplies needed: for the Matryoshka dolls, I used a fat quarter of quilting cotton. For the Nutcracker friends, I purchased a panel of Alexander Henry fabric and some green dotted fabric for the backs. For the Cactus Family, I used my cut-and-sew panel from Spoonflower, printed on a yard of minky. You'll also need a bag of stuffing, thread, and a needle for hand-sewing.

Cost: for the Matryoskha dolls, everything I used was scraps from my stash. The fabric for the Nutcracker friends cost about $15.00. The cut-and-sew Cactus Family is $27.00. A bag of stuffing will cost about $4.00.

Time: about an hour for each set.

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For the Matryoshka dolls, I began with a small amount of standard quilting fabric. Your fabric could have animals or trucks or anything you'd like to make into a stuffed toy. Cut out the doll shape, leaving about .25" seam allowance around the print. Then cut out a matching piece from the fabric to use for the back of the doll.

Place the pieces together, right sides facing, and pin around the edges. Sew using a .25" seam allowance, leaving the bottom open for stuffing. I also recommend clipping the curves after sewing so the doll will turn right-side-out nicely.

Flip the doll right-side-out, and fill the doll with stuffing. You can hand stitch the opening closed in a number of ways - do whatever type of hand sewing is easiest for you.

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The Nutcracker panel has plenty of white space around each of the characters. Since these characters were more detailed than the Matryoshkas, you can leave the cut quite rough, planning to trace a wide outline using the sewing machine. Likewise, the backing fabric doesn't need to be cut to shape - only to size.

Place the pieces together, right sides facing, and pin around the edges. Sew a loose outline at least .25" away from the print, and trim the excess fabric.

Flip the doll right-side-out, stuff and sew closed.


The cut-and-sew Cactus Family has cut lines to follow, and a piece for the back of each character.

Pin the pieces together, right sides facing and sew around the edge using a .25" seam allowance, leaving the bottom open for stuffing. Flip right side out, stuff and sew closed.

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Ugly Sweater Mug Rug

It's been a while since I participated in an Instagram swap, but this year's Ugly Sweater Mug Rug Swap was too cute to not join in.

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Supplies needed: scraps of Christmas-y cotton fabric, 7" square of cotton batting, thread, fabric for binding

Cost: assuming you work from scraps of fabric and batting, the only cost will be for the pattern - $6.00

Time: about an hour - if paper piecing intimidates you, check out my tutorial for a freezer paper method that won't make you crazy.

Using this pattern from Kid Giddy, I created an ugly Christmas sweater for my partner from scrap fabric I had on hand. The pattern comes with two styles of sweater - a crew neck and a v-neck. Hopefully this is ugly enough for my partner! I had a lot of fun quilting the plaid design, and I like the way it looks from the back almost as much as from the front. You can check out all the photos from the swap on Instagram.

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The Pajama Game

Pajamas make a great Christmas gift because they're easy to make, easy to customize, and easy to fit since they're so forgiving. This week, I'm sharing three of my favorite free pajama shorts patterns with you. When paired with a coordinating cami or tank top, any lady would be thrilled to receive these handmade jammies.

City Gym Shorts

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While technically not a pajama pattern, there's no reason these can't serve as jammie shorts. You can make them from voile or rayon for a soft, luxurious feel, or from flannel for a cozy pair. I made a pair from cotton because I love this print but wasn't sure it would fly as actual clothing on a grown ass lady.

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The City Gym Shorts pattern is available in sizes for all ages from Purl Soho. They have a distinctly athletic look, which I love. The pattern calls for bias tape, so be sure to check out my easy bias tape tutorial to make what you need for this project.

 

Madeleine Bloomers

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This pattern from Colette is feminine and cheeky as well as a breeze to sew up.

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The little details like the bows at the legs and the frilly, cinched waist make these really special. I sewed mine from some beautiful sheer cotton voile, but there are so many luxurious fabrics you could choose from.

 

Easy Boxer Shorts

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Last but not least, these easy boxer shorts from eHow are incredibly comfortable and incredibly simple to make.

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I used some soft waistband elastic in a fun color as suggested in the tutorial, and I couldn't be happier with how they fit and feel.

Bias Tape from a Fat Quarter

If you're making something this holiday season that requires bias tape or bias binding, I've got a nifty trick to share with you. You can make 5+ yards of continuous bias tape from a single fat quarter!

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I know...you're wondering why I would bother going to the trouble of making my own when it comes conveniently prepackaged at JoAnn's for the same price as a fat quarter without having to do all the work. There are two reasons I like to make my own. First, the prepackaged stuff has been chemically forced into unnatural stiffness. Maybe that's your thing, but I feel like when you're working on a project that needs bias tape to flow along the curves, it should, well, flow along the curves. Easily. Second, the prepackaged bias tape doesn't have a great selection of colors. One red, one blue, one pink, etc. Sometimes it looks best to customize your bias tape to your project. I'll admit to occasionally using the store-bought kind on the interior of garments and bags, but when the bias tape is going to be visible, I like to coordinate or match it to the project.

Let's begin with a fat quarter, which is approximately 18" x 22".

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Take one corner and fold it down to square off the fat quarter. Press a crease along that fold line with your fingers - no need to iron.

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Using a ruler and a rotary cutter, cut along the crease line.

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Take the triangle you just cut from the right side of the fat quarter and move it around to the left side as pictured below.

Place these pieces wrong sides together as shown, and sew along the edge using a .25" seam allowance and a short stitch length. We'll be cutting through this seam, so we want it to hold up well. I used a 1.5mm stitch length for mine.

Press the seam open.

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Using a clear ruler, mark lines along the fabric every 1.75". While I do own fabric marking pens, you'll see that I'm using a trusty old mechanical pencil. There's one more seam to press open before we finish with these lines and I don't want my iron to wipe them out...hence, the pencil.

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Now comes the awkward part. We'll fold our fabric and pin the two diagonal edges together. The fabric is going to bunch up big time, but it is my solemn promise to you that no one will die as a result of this. We'll begin with one section hanging off the edge of our fabric, and pin by matching the pencil lines together. When matching these, it's important to match where they meet up .25" in from the edge. If you match them up along the edge, they won't match up once they're sewn.

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When you're done pinning, it'll look roughly like this. Yes - it appears to be a hot mess. But it will be 5 yards of continuous bias tape when it grows up. Really.

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Sew along the pinned edge, taking care to keep the fabric smooth where you're sewing. Just push the bunchy bits off to the side and take your time.

Press the seam you just sewed open.

Starting on either side where that excess fabric is hanging off the edge, cut through one layer of fabric along your marked line.

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See? I told you it would be 5 continuous yards and NOT a hot mess!

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Now comes the pressing part. If you have a bias tape maker, congratulations! You are much fancier than I am. In case you aren't any fancier than me, here's how I press mine. First, I press the tape in half.

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Then, I press both raw edges into that center line I just pressed.

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As I go, I wind it around an index card or whatever's handy...in this case, a paint swatch.

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And that's it! 5 yards of continuous bias tape from one fat quarter!

Fat Quarter Tea Towels

This week's Handmade Holiday gift idea is a fat-quarter friendly tea towel project.

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Supplies needed: fat quarter of medium- to heavy-weight fabric (see note below regarding fabric selection), ~5" of ribbon or twill tape (scraps will work fine!), thread, scissors, sewing machine, iron, pressing board, a couple of straight pins or Clover clips

Cost: up to ~$15.00 (price will vary greatly based on your fabric choice)

Time: 15-20 minutes, plus the time you spend shopping for fabric, which could be considerable

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A note about fabric selection

For a beautiful, long-lasting tea towel, you will want a fabric with a heavier hand than quilting cotton. I would recommend linen, twill, or canvas. For my tea towels, I'm using Linen Cotton Canvas from Spoonflower. I'm not just pimping Spoonflower because I have designs for sale there...there are a few reasons this works well. First, the Linen Cotton Canvas is a durable choice for tea towels. Second, while a standard fat quarter of fabric is about 18" x 22", fat quarters of this fabric are 18" x 27", which is a great size for a tea towel. Third, Spoonflower introduced a feature earlier this year where you can Fill-a-Yard of fabric with multiple designs, so one yard of fabric can yield 4 different tea towels! This saves you money, and allows you to make unique towels for everyone on your list.

Now to dive in!

If your fabric has any selvedge, trim that away before pressing.

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You'll press 1/2" on all 4 sides, and then fold that over and press again to enclose the raw edges.

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Cut a piece of twill tape (or ribbon) to about 5" long, Tuck this under the pressed edges in one of the top corners, running diagonally across the corner as shown below.

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In order to keep the twill tape from shifting during sewing, you'll want to secure it with a couple of pins or Clover clips.

Since the stitching will be very visible on the front of the towel, I like to sew from the front. Do whatever floats your boat, though! You'll stitch at the 1/2" mark around all 4 sides, pivoting at the corners.

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And that's it! You've made a beautiful tea towel that adds personality to any kitchen.

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If you're interested in purchasing the design shown in the example photos, you can find it here in my Spoonflower shop. If you'd like to learn how to design a tea towel calendar of your own, check out my calendar design class on Skillshare.

Simple swaddling blankets

I know there's been a lot of baby gift making lately, but it's new baby season in my circle, and these projects are just so much fun to share! There are so many great choices for fabrics and baby items are typically pretty easy to make.

Today I'm sharing some simple swaddling blankets I made for a new arrival. These flannel blankets are made with serged edges and take very little prep work - a stack can easily be completed in under an hour.

I bought one-yard cuts of flannel fabric, and pre-washed them. Begin by folding one yard in half one way, and then in half the other way (this would technically be called 'folding in quarters', but I want to be clear that it gets folded one way and then the other.)

In the photo above, the folded sides of the fabric are on the right side and the bottom. All of the selvedges (the edges with copyright and printing information) are now on the left hand side, and the raw edges are on the top. Now we'll trim the selvedges off - don't worry about the top/raw edges just yet.

Now we'll round the corners of the blanket. This gives it a nice, soft feel - and makes the sewing process much easier! I used a rounded plate as a guide for my corners. Your trimming doesn't have to be perfect...the serger is going to clean it up nicely for you. Just be sure you are trimming the upper left-hand corner - the one without folds. If you cut through your folds, you're going to be sad.

That's it for prep - you're ready to serge! Start in the middle of one side, in the straight area. This will be much easier and more secure than starting with one of the rounded corners. You don't need to factor in any seam allowance - just run your fabric right along the edge of the knife blade. It will trim away any wonky strings, but you don't need it to really remove any of the fabric.

Take the corners slowly, just following the curve you cut.

When you get close to the beginning of your stitching, lift the presser foot and tuck your thread tail under the needle. This will lock that thread tail into the seam and keep it from breaking loose with repeated use and washing of the blanket.

Once your stitching is overlapping where you started, just sew off the edge of the blanket. This will leave a thread tail that needs to be tucked in.

Using a large needle, tuck that thread tail into the stitching to secure.

Now trim the tails and you're done! You've made a blanket (or more likely, a whole mess of blankets) that are perfect for swaddling and tummy time. Babies everywhere will adore you, and so will their parents.

Quilt binding by machine with a flange

I've always been a fan of finishing quilt binding by hand. I sew my binding to the front of my quilt using a machine, and then use an invisible hand-stitch on the backside of the quilt for a nice clean finish. Practically speaking though, this takes a lot of time. And yes...you spent a lot of time making the quilt so why not spend the time sewing the binding by hand? I (usually) agree, but sometimes quick is good. Also, machine binding can hold up a little better in instances where the quilt will get a lot of wear and tear - baby blankets, for example, will be heavily used and washed over time and machine binding may hang in there longer under that kind of love (abuse).

For the baby quilt I've been working on, I decided to add a machine binding with a flange. I think this is a great way to add a machine binding without it looking sloppy, and it gives the quilt a little something extra.

For a flange binding, you'll be using two fabrics - a main binding fabric and a flange fabric. I chose a red & white scallop print for my main binding and a black & white wood grain print for my flange fabric. I cut my main binding fabric the way I usually would, and cut the flange binding fabric .25" wider than the main binding fabric. It may seem counter-intuitive to cut the main binding thinner than the flange, but I promise it will all make sense.

Sew the main fabric and flange fabric wrong sides together using a .25" seam allowance.

Press the seam towards the main binding fabric. It will look like this front and back.

Now you'll press the binding in half, just as you would with non-flange binding. On one side, you'll be able to see the main and flange fabrics, and on the other, you'll only see the flange fabric.

You're going to attach the binding to the quilt on the back side of the quilt with the flange fabric facing up.

I'm not going to cover how to miter your corners in this post - I'm assuming you've bound a quilt before. If you haven't and need basic info, here's a great tutorial for beginners.

Once your binding is attached to the back of your quilt, fold it over to the front of the quilt. You'll be stitching in the ditch - sewing where the flange fabric meets the main binding fabric. This will keep your stitching even with the binding on the backside and nearly invisible from the front of your quilt.

 

While the binding stitches aren't invisible on the backside, they're even with the binding and if you've chosen your thread color well, they blend right in.

Foundation paper piecing that won't make you want to lay down in traffic

20-some years ago, my sister was born, changing my life for the better in so many ways. I had a playmate, a friend, a partner in crime. We have had our rough patches, but I love her dearly and couldn’t ask for a better sister. While we’re very different from each other, we have much in common – sewing, for one. She recently taught me a technique that changed the way I was paper piecing (or wasn’t paper piecing, since I was always so frustrated with it that I usually shoved those projects aside in favor of something that wouldn’t make me crazy). The method she uses isn’t radical – instead of sewing through her paper pattern piece, she uses freezer paper, a dry iron, and folding to create beautifully pieced blocks. Now I do too!

Trace your block onto the dull side of freezer paper.  Number the pieces in the same way you would for a regular paper pattern. In the example below, I added my seam allowance to the block. I’m apt to mess that part up – out of sight, out of mind – but you don’t have to. Just prepare the pattern the same way you usually would – just use freezer paper.

Select a scrap of fabric for piece #1. Make sure it is large enough to cover the whole space with .25″ seam allowance on all sides. I hold mine up to the light to check. If it is much larger (like my example), don’t worry about cutting it down to size. By the time we’re done with this block all of your seam allowances will be beautiful and the piece will be the perfect size.

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Hit it with an iron. You’ll want to put the wrong side of your fabric against the freezer paper and tack it in place with a dry iron.

Fold the freezer paper along the line between piece 1 and piece 2. Trim the exposed fabric to a .25″ seam allowance. I eyeball it, but you can use a rotary cutter and ruler if you like…it’s more time intensive, but if it makes you feel better, go for it.

Select a scrap of fabric for piece #2. Make sure it is large enough to cover the whole space with .25″ seam allowance on all sides. Place this piece right sides together with piece #1, aligning the edges. Sew with a .25″ seam allowance, right up against the freezer paper. If you accidentally sew into the freezer paper, it’s not the end of the world. If you can avoid doing that, you can reuse the template 3-4 times before it loses it’s stick, so try not to.

Fold the freezer paper pattern back to flat, ironing briefly over the seam allowances to hold them in place. Then fold piece #2 out and iron as well.

Continue folding, trimming, sewing, and ironing for all of the pieces in your pattern. When you’re done, it will look something like this.

This is the point where I pull out the rotary cutter and square up my block.

Once you’ve trimmed the edges, you can peel back the freezer paper template to reuse until it loses it’s stick. Your block will be beautiful front AND back!

I’m including a printable version of this pattern for you. I’d love to hear what you think of the technique!

Cotton Baby Crib Bumpers

With several family members expecting babies this spring, I've been busy sewing up baby gifts, like these easy flannel burp cloths. Significantly easier to say 3 times fast and much easier to make than rubber baby buggy bumpers, crib bumpers are a lovely way to personalize a nursery and are a great gift when paired with baby bedding. (Before you go nuts in the comments section, let me say that crib bumpers are discouraged for newborn and young infants. We are constantly learning better ways to care for infants and children, so check with your pediatrician for the latest recommendations. I haven't had a baby in 13 years and am certainly not an expert.)

I purchased a selection of prints and solids for making crib bumpers and a quilt from Fancy Tiger Crafts.

I purchased a package of Fairfield Nu Foam crib bumper pads and used their free pattern, which you can download here.

The pattern was easy to follow and in an evening I was able to make the set!

Happy Hour Tea Towel Calendar

Every year, I design a tea towel calendar as one of my Christmas gifts. My friends and family have come to expect them, and I look forward to coming up with a new theme each year. I knew that we were going to need lots of cocktails in 2017, so I featured 12 of my favorite grown-up beverages.

I sketched each of the drinks in pencil, and included simple recipes. I knew that the recipes would be too much text for the tea towel, but who knows what else I might do with these illustrations?

I inked my drawings and pulled them into Illustrator for finishing.

After I finalized the layout, I uploaded my design to Spoonflower for printing. The calendar is sized to fit on a single fat quarter of Linen Cotton Canvas, and a simple hem around the edge is all that's needed to make a towel that will liven up any kitchen or bar!

If you'd like your own Happy Hour tea towel calendar, you can purchase this design in my Spoonflower shop!

Arrowhead Quilt

Perhaps you'll remember my Autumn Arrowhead quilt block. In case you don't, check out this post to see how this SUPER easy block is constructed. (When I say SUPER easy, I mean it...I sewed all of my blocks for this quilt in under 2 hours.) While these blocks can certainly be pieced side by side, I tried something different for this quilt.

My sister and I decided that our favorite aunt should have a quilt made with this block for her birthday this year. We divided up the fabric and each made 10 blocks. We used the same neutral gray fabric for all of the blocks and a variety of solids and prints in a colorway we think she'll like. I added sashing and cornerstones when piecing the top, and I think it really added to the overall design.

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I used free motion quilting in the neutral spaces of the blocks, and some straight-line quilting in the sashing, leaving the prints/solids unquilted. I'm usually a very dense-coverage sort of quilter, so this was a new approach for me, and it makes the prints really pop.

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Now all we have to do is bind it and gift it!

Quick and easy baby gifts

Today I'm revisiting the most popular post from my old blog. I've been making lots of baby gifts this month, and I simply have to share these easy flannel burp cloths - quick to sew up and always sure to please!

These flannel burp cloths make a wonderful baby gift. They’re easy to make, and while they are a practical item they are a lot of fun when sewn up in unique flannel prints – the possibilities are endless! The curved shape helps them stay on your shoulder during burping, and also allows them to wrap around baby’s neck to act as a bib. I’ve made these for lots of new mothers, and they get rave reviews every time.

In addition to your usual sewing notions and thread, to make these burp cloths you will need:

Flannel – You can get 2 complete burp cloths out of a half yard of flannel if you’re using the same fabric for front and back. I like to use different fabrics for the front and back, so a half yard each of two fabrics will yield 4 burp cloths.

Batting – I like to use Warm & Natural cotton batting. Whatever batting you choose, you want something lightweight and low-loft for best results. You can buy specifically for this project or just use scraps. You will need a piece of batting about 8.75″ x 19″ for each burp cloth.

Pattern – You can download my pattern piece here.

Cut out one piece of flannel for the front and one for the back. The pattern is designed to be cut on the fold. You can layer up and cut out two at a time, but cutting flannel is hard on your hands – some times less is more. You will also need to cut out one piece of batting in the same fashion.

Sandwich the pieces like so – batting followed by flannel pieces right sides together on top. Pin around the edge, leaving a gap along the inside curve. We’ll use this opening to flip the burp cloths right side out once we’ve sewn the sandwich together. Sew with a .25″ seam allowance around the edge, leaving the opening at the inside curve unsewn.

Clip the seam allowance to 1/8″, leaving the seam allowance as-is around the inside curve. We’ll be turning this allowance in to sew the opening closed. Turn the burp cloth right side out. You can press it with an iron at this stage, but I actually find that finger pressing produces fewer puckers when top-stitching than pressing with an iron.

Fold the .25″ seam allowance inside the burp cloth along the inside curve and pin. Top-stitch all around the burp cloth using an 1/8″ seam allowance.

And that’s it – doesn’t take much to make a beautiful and useful baby gift!

The Necessary Clutch Wallet

I haven't done much sewing for myself (or in general) since the wedding last November....until now! Today I'm sharing the Necessary Clutch Wallet I recently made.

Necessary Clutch Wallet

This wallet features lots of pockets and pouches, and enough room to hold your phone and checkbook, making it a perfectly-sized carry-all when you don't want a big bag weighing you down.

Necessary Clutch Wallet Interior

There's a zipper pocket, generous card pockets, and slots for cash money!

The pattern is by Emmaline Bags, and there is a mini version available as well. Be sure to check out their amazing selection of purse hardware, too...this website is incredible for bag makers!

Necessary Clutch Wallet In Progress

The pattern was very easy to follow, with great photos and instructions. While I will probably make a few changes next time, those are personal preference and not because the pattern wasn't spot on - it was great! The wallet took just an afternoon to sew up, and I'm very pleased with how it turned out. Head over to Emmaline Bags to download your pattern and check out #necessaryclutchwallet on Instagram to get some inspiration!

2016 - The Year of Big Quilts!

Last week I declared that while I don't make New Year's resolutions, I did resolve to try and make big quilts this year. That's right...I don't always follow the rules, even when they're my own.

For my first big quilt of 2016, I decided on a Double Wedding ring quilt made with fabric from our recent wedding (fitting, I know). We used homemade cloth napkins for the reception, which have been washed, rewashed, and pressed, as well as fabric from various items like the ring pillow.

I know that it is a luxury that a typical modern quilt is made from lovely fabric, purchased for the purpose of quilting, cut into a bunch of pieces and sewn together as part of a plan. I kind of like that this quilt shares something with the quilts of my ancestors - made from fabric that served another purpose first and led a good, useful life before it became a quilt.

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I splurged and purchased the Simpli-EZ Double Wedding Ring Ruler set in an attempt to not lose my mind cutting or tracing the many many many many pieces needed for the quilt. So far, I have managed to cut 607 tiny wedges without completely losing my mind.

One day soon I'll be able to get to the fun part...the sewing. But for now, I need to run and buy some more blades for my rotary cutter.

While visions of sugarplums danced in their heads

When I was a child, no occasion went unmarked by a festive pillowcase. It began with Christmas pillowcases for me and my sister, lovingly sewn by my grandmother. We were so delighted that she kept making them. Birthdays, Valentine's day, Tuesdays - any reason was good enough for a special pillowcase. As time passed and fabric selection improved (along with her sewing machine), the pillowcases became more spectacular. My children have pillowcases she made with glow in the dark embroidery of their names! Our home now has no shortage of festive pillowcases for most occasions, so this year I decided I would spread some cheer and carry on this tradition by making pillowcases for my nieces and nephew.

 

These make a great gift and are super-quick to sew up in a pinch. You can even use them as gift bags! To make a pillowcase, you'll need one yard of fabric (I pre-wash mine...shrinkage after sewing isn't a big issue for pillowcases, but it softens the fabric up nicely). Fold it wrong sides together from selvage to selvage. I don't bother trimming off the fuzzy selvage edge - we're going to use French seams, so that will get trimmed away eventually. I simply sew along the selvage in this step. You'll sew across the top/short side and down the long side opposite the fold. Leave the bottom open - you have to be able to get the pillow in!

Now you're going to trim away that fuzzy bit and most of the seam allowance/selvage. You want less than 1/4"...just trim as close to the stitching as you are comfortable doing.

Now turn the pillowcase wrong side out and press the seams you just sewed.

Now stitch across the top and the long edge using a 1/4" seam allowance.

Now, before you get excited and flip the pillowcase right side out, let's do the bottom hem. Turn up and press 1/4".

Now turn up 3 1/2" and press. This will make the cuff, so to speak, of the pillowcase.

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Now stitch about 1/8" from the turned up edge. I moved the needle over because I have a fancy sewing machine, but you can eyeball it or mark it if your needle doesn't move. The goal is to make sure you close in that raw edge you turned under, so 1/4" is too much.

And that's it! Turn it right side out and your pillowcase is ready to enjoy!