Ugly Sweater Mug Rug

It's been a while since I participated in an Instagram swap, but this year's Ugly Sweater Mug Rug Swap was too cute to not join in.

IMG_1109.JPG

Supplies needed: scraps of Christmas-y cotton fabric, 7" square of cotton batting, thread, fabric for binding

Cost: assuming you work from scraps of fabric and batting, the only cost will be for the pattern - $6.00

Time: about an hour - if paper piecing intimidates you, check out my tutorial for a freezer paper method that won't make you crazy.

Using this pattern from Kid Giddy, I created an ugly Christmas sweater for my partner from scrap fabric I had on hand. The pattern comes with two styles of sweater - a crew neck and a v-neck. Hopefully this is ugly enough for my partner! I had a lot of fun quilting the plaid design, and I like the way it looks from the back almost as much as from the front. You can check out all the photos from the swap on Instagram.

IMG_1108.JPG

The Pajama Game

Pajamas make a great Christmas gift because they're easy to make, easy to customize, and easy to fit since they're so forgiving. This week, I'm sharing three of my favorite free pajama shorts patterns with you. When paired with a coordinating cami or tank top, any lady would be thrilled to receive these handmade jammies.

City Gym Shorts

City Outfit.JPG

While technically not a pajama pattern, there's no reason these can't serve as jammie shorts. You can make them from voile or rayon for a soft, luxurious feel, or from flannel for a cozy pair. I made a pair from cotton because I love this print but wasn't sure it would fly as actual clothing on a grown ass lady.

City Detail.JPG

The City Gym Shorts pattern is available in sizes for all ages from Purl Soho. They have a distinctly athletic look, which I love. The pattern calls for bias tape, so be sure to check out my easy bias tape tutorial to make what you need for this project.

 

Madeleine Bloomers

Madeleine Outfit.JPG

This pattern from Colette is feminine and cheeky as well as a breeze to sew up.

Madeleine Detail.JPG

The little details like the bows at the legs and the frilly, cinched waist make these really special. I sewed mine from some beautiful sheer cotton voile, but there are so many luxurious fabrics you could choose from.

 

Easy Boxer Shorts

Boxer Outfit.JPG

Last but not least, these easy boxer shorts from eHow are incredibly comfortable and incredibly simple to make.

Boxer Detail.JPG

I used some soft waistband elastic in a fun color as suggested in the tutorial, and I couldn't be happier with how they fit and feel.

Simple Circle Pouch Tutorial

Earlier this week, I was preparing for a road trip and found myself in need of some pouches to organize bits and bobs that I'd be taking with me. I didn't need anything big and fancy, and didn't want to spend much time on them. I just wanted something sturdy and cute that I could toss in my bag.

I sewed up a couple of these simple circle pouches using my Let's Play House fabric, but this project is also suitable for scraps. Altogether, I used about a fat quarter of fabric for each, including the lining and zipper tab.

To create my circle pattern I used a small plate from my kitchen, which measured a little over 7", so my fabric pieces just needed to be a little larger than that.

1.jpg

You will need to cut:

 - 2 circles each from exterior fabric, lining fabric, and batting

 - 1 rectangle at 2.5" x 5" from lining fabric (or a suitable size for your circle)

You will also need a zipper that is longer than the width of your circle. For my ~7" circle, I used 9" zippers.

2.jpg

Set aside one set of circles, and cut one of each fabric/batting exactly in half. These will make the front the pouch. I did this by folding them in half and cutting along the fold.

Take one of each half-circle and pin with the top edge of your zipper in the following order, bottom to top:

 - Lining fabric, right side up

 - Zipper, right side up

 - Exterior fabric, wrong side up

 - Batting

4.jpg

Sew through all layers using a zipper foot. If you don't have a zipper foot, use 1/4" seam allowance and sew carefully!

Flip the fabric/batting away from the zipper and press. Top stitch through all layers 1/4" from the zipper.

Flip the unsewn edge of your zipper up, and repeat the steps above for your remaining half-circles.

7.jpg
8.jpg

Take the rectangle of lining fabric, and press it in half, long edges together.

Unfold the rectangle, and iron the long edges in to the middle line you just creased.

12.jpg

Fold along the crease and press again, making sure the long, raw edges are tucked in. Sew along the open edge with 1/8" seam allowance. Set aside.

Open the zipper slightly, and pin the opening closed. Baste the opening, across the zipper teeth, close to the edge of your circle. Go slowly - be careful not to break your needle on the zipper teeth.

16.jpg

Now fold the zipper tab in half, and place at the opening you just basted. I put mine inside the circle by about 1". Leave the raw edges to hang with the ends of your zipper (we'll cut the excess away later), and baste in place.

17.jpg
18.jpg

Take your fabric circles, and layer as follows, bottom to top:

 - Lining fabric, wrong side up

 - Batting

 - Exterior fabric, right side up

19.jpg

Make sure the zipper on your pouch front is open and layer it with your fabric circles. The pouch front should be lining side up. Pin in place all around the circle.

20.jpg

Using 1/4" seam allowance, sew around the entire circle through all the layers. Take care as you sew over the zipper teeth. (Can you tell I've broken a few needles in my time?)

Using sharp scissors, trim through the excess zipper tape. I also trimmed the raw edges of the pouch with pinking shears to prevent fraying.

Flip the pouch right side out and press. Topstitch through all layers using 1/4" seam allowance and a long stitch.

25.jpg

Now your pouch is ready to be filled with whatever goodies you'd like!

26.jpg

Kismet Trinket Boxes

This weekend, I sewed up some Kismet Trinket Boxes by Sara Lawson of Sew Sweetness. I'd been wanting to give these a try for some time - I had so much fun making her Crimson & Clover train case pattern, and this set of itty bitty cases was just too cute to pass up.

IMG_0068.JPG

I made the large and small versions of the square case using some of my upcoming fabric, Let's Play House.

IMG_0063.JPG

This fat quarter-friendly project was easier than I expected. I had to take my time on the small curves, but the boxes came together pretty quickly, and I'm really pleased with how they turned out.  

 

IMG_0066.JPG